caddyman: (Strangelove)
You know that it's a slow news day in the middle of the silly season when you find non-stories like this on the BBC News website.

Essentially, someone has found a 62 year-old ex-Pat Briton in New Zealand who is not Lord Lucan. He says he's not, the police say he's not but:

Neighbour Margaret Harris said she became convinced he was Lord Lucan after seeing a picture of the peer in an old magazine.

She told TVNZ: "I spotted this piece and I thought 'oh my God, don't tell me that's who he is?'.

"I'm sure that is who he is because he is trying to make out he's a very poor man; poor my foot."
So that's all right then.


Lord Lucan and Mr Woodgate
caddyman: (Strangelove)
You know that it's a slow news day in the middle of the silly season when you find non-stories like this on the BBC News website.

Essentially, someone has found a 62 year-old ex-Pat Briton in New Zealand who is not Lord Lucan. He says he's not, the police say he's not but:

Neighbour Margaret Harris said she became convinced he was Lord Lucan after seeing a picture of the peer in an old magazine.

She told TVNZ: "I spotted this piece and I thought 'oh my God, don't tell me that's who he is?'.

"I'm sure that is who he is because he is trying to make out he's a very poor man; poor my foot."
So that's all right then.


Lord Lucan and Mr Woodgate
caddyman: (Stupid Boy!)
Never let it be said that newspapers in the UK, particularly London, are sensationalist, or indeed in any way alarmist.

That said, this was the headline on the Evening Standard billboards outside Victoria Station this evening:
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
caddyman: (Stupid Boy!)
Never let it be said that newspapers in the UK, particularly London, are sensationalist, or indeed in any way alarmist.

That said, this was the headline on the Evening Standard billboards outside Victoria Station this evening:
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Semper Buy

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2007 02:37 pm
caddyman: (I beg your pardon?)
It’s been one of those mornings whereby I have seriously considered the option of running away to sea, though I fear that I am probably too old and lazy to make a go of that.

The mercantile marine; it sounds like a tough life. Assaulting the shores of a foreign country or parachuting into the back of beyond and aggressively trading goods for import and export. An extension of the economy through other means: the antithesis of fair trade, perhaps.

I’m not sure that this afternoon is going to be any more fun. I’m not sure why, but a lot of people seem to have adopted me as the person to ask obscure questions about things I have no knowledge of. More to the point, they seem to be telling other people that I’m the contact point for every obscure piece of drivel they can think of, so I am spending an inordinate amount of time discussing things I’d rather someone else dealt with and only finding out after a period that it’s all been a colossal waste of time. Ah well.

Somehow this failed to make the entertainment headlines and I’ve only found out a week later. Bobby "Boris" Pickett of Monster Mash fame died on 25 April. One of the few entertainers to revel in his ‘one hit wonder’ status, he was apparently known to stand up at gigs and announce that he would sing a medley of his hit.

A Graveyard Smash

Bobby “Boris” Pickett
1938-2007


It seems that the session musicians who made up the "Crypt Kickers" for the recording included one Leon Russell. Bet most of you ain’t never heard of the bloke.

Semper Buy

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2007 02:37 pm
caddyman: (I beg your pardon?)
It’s been one of those mornings whereby I have seriously considered the option of running away to sea, though I fear that I am probably too old and lazy to make a go of that.

The mercantile marine; it sounds like a tough life. Assaulting the shores of a foreign country or parachuting into the back of beyond and aggressively trading goods for import and export. An extension of the economy through other means: the antithesis of fair trade, perhaps.

I’m not sure that this afternoon is going to be any more fun. I’m not sure why, but a lot of people seem to have adopted me as the person to ask obscure questions about things I have no knowledge of. More to the point, they seem to be telling other people that I’m the contact point for every obscure piece of drivel they can think of, so I am spending an inordinate amount of time discussing things I’d rather someone else dealt with and only finding out after a period that it’s all been a colossal waste of time. Ah well.

Somehow this failed to make the entertainment headlines and I’ve only found out a week later. Bobby "Boris" Pickett of Monster Mash fame died on 25 April. One of the few entertainers to revel in his ‘one hit wonder’ status, he was apparently known to stand up at gigs and announce that he would sing a medley of his hit.

A Graveyard Smash

Bobby “Boris” Pickett
1938-2007


It seems that the session musicians who made up the "Crypt Kickers" for the recording included one Leon Russell. Bet most of you ain’t never heard of the bloke.
caddyman: (Strangelove)
The Times has the first review of the movie of the Da Vinci Code. It is assessed as pleasingly entertaining claptrap and says the film is a cat’s cradle of lunatic ideas with lashings of religious psychobabble, but it’s infinitely easier to forgive than the book that begat it.

Three stars out of five.

I find the whole furore quite funny, really. The book is an ordinary thriller: not particularly well written, but far from being the worst thing out there. The main point of the controversy is simply that it’s been read so widely and generated so much income for its author. Had the Catholic Church just sat down and shut up, I doubt it would have sold a quarter as many copies. Call me an old cynic, but I wouldn’t be at all surprised if some retirement fund for aged clerics isn’t a shareholder in Random House publishers.

I have entirely failed to understand the outbursts of outrage. A church is an institution with the purpose of purveying faith according to its preferred dogma. It’s a business, that’s all, its business just happens to be spirituality. It shouldn’t hope to hold a position of privilege preventing it from being portrayed in any negative light in a novel.

What price the Reformation if that was still true?

Equally, while I’m not a religious bloke – I hover somewhere on the edge of agnosticism and atheism – I have a lot of friends who are religious. And they seem to have enough faith and common sense to know that all this controversy over the Da Vinci Code is just claptrap drummed up by the chattering classes and the media.

Only a member of a congregation who is already harbouring serious doubts is going to be worried by a novel and a movie; everyone else either recognises it as a bit of diverting tosh, or is calmed by the knowledge that God can look after Himself if He feels the need.

It’s a poor church that can’t withstand the onslaught of a poorly constructed novel, and a weak faith that crumbles in the face of the Da Vinci Code.

I have no idea if I’m going to see the movie or not. I’m torn between the thought of giving a portion of my hard earned cash to Dan Brown (it will only encourage him) and going to see what the fuss is all about.

In the meantime, what gives me the fear is not the thought that the Roman Catholic Church might have suppressed the “truth” for 2,000 years, or that Opus Dei is composed of a bunch of mad albino monks. No, it’s none of that. What gives me the fear is Tom Hanks in a wig.
caddyman: (Strangelove)
The Times has the first review of the movie of the Da Vinci Code. It is assessed as pleasingly entertaining claptrap and says the film is a cat’s cradle of lunatic ideas with lashings of religious psychobabble, but it’s infinitely easier to forgive than the book that begat it.

Three stars out of five.

I find the whole furore quite funny, really. The book is an ordinary thriller: not particularly well written, but far from being the worst thing out there. The main point of the controversy is simply that it’s been read so widely and generated so much income for its author. Had the Catholic Church just sat down and shut up, I doubt it would have sold a quarter as many copies. Call me an old cynic, but I wouldn’t be at all surprised if some retirement fund for aged clerics isn’t a shareholder in Random House publishers.

I have entirely failed to understand the outbursts of outrage. A church is an institution with the purpose of purveying faith according to its preferred dogma. It’s a business, that’s all, its business just happens to be spirituality. It shouldn’t hope to hold a position of privilege preventing it from being portrayed in any negative light in a novel.

What price the Reformation if that was still true?

Equally, while I’m not a religious bloke – I hover somewhere on the edge of agnosticism and atheism – I have a lot of friends who are religious. And they seem to have enough faith and common sense to know that all this controversy over the Da Vinci Code is just claptrap drummed up by the chattering classes and the media.

Only a member of a congregation who is already harbouring serious doubts is going to be worried by a novel and a movie; everyone else either recognises it as a bit of diverting tosh, or is calmed by the knowledge that God can look after Himself if He feels the need.

It’s a poor church that can’t withstand the onslaught of a poorly constructed novel, and a weak faith that crumbles in the face of the Da Vinci Code.

I have no idea if I’m going to see the movie or not. I’m torn between the thought of giving a portion of my hard earned cash to Dan Brown (it will only encourage him) and going to see what the fuss is all about.

In the meantime, what gives me the fear is not the thought that the Roman Catholic Church might have suppressed the “truth” for 2,000 years, or that Opus Dei is composed of a bunch of mad albino monks. No, it’s none of that. What gives me the fear is Tom Hanks in a wig.

A dazzling idea

Thursday, October 27th, 2005 03:41 pm
caddyman: (I beg your pardon?)
By rights I ought to be as pissed off as a pissed off thing right now. It’s work related, and if you’ve been reading the tale of woe, you will know the object of my irritation.

But no, I am in a good mood. Why, you may ask? Well, it is those lovely little Austrians. Particularly, the good burghers of Rattenberg, a village high in the Austrian Tyrol; Rattenberg is situated on the north side of a mountain, and gets no direct sunshine between November and February.

The worthy inhabitants get depressed during this part of the year, and the population is in decline.

Their solution? Wopping great heliostat mirrors across the valley set to track the sun and reflect the light into the high street.

I’m not making this up, either!

Fan-bloody-tastic.

A dazzling idea

Thursday, October 27th, 2005 03:41 pm
caddyman: (I beg your pardon?)
By rights I ought to be as pissed off as a pissed off thing right now. It’s work related, and if you’ve been reading the tale of woe, you will know the object of my irritation.

But no, I am in a good mood. Why, you may ask? Well, it is those lovely little Austrians. Particularly, the good burghers of Rattenberg, a village high in the Austrian Tyrol; Rattenberg is situated on the north side of a mountain, and gets no direct sunshine between November and February.

The worthy inhabitants get depressed during this part of the year, and the population is in decline.

Their solution? Wopping great heliostat mirrors across the valley set to track the sun and reflect the light into the high street.

I’m not making this up, either!

Fan-bloody-tastic.

Timing

Monday, June 20th, 2005 12:28 pm
caddyman: (Default)
In one of those moments of cinematic timing, Office Services have just announced over the tannoy, that due to a security alert, the Metropolitan Police have closed Victoria Street from Westminster to the Albert pub. That's a half mile section of the street from Parliament Square down toward the station.

Just as that announcement had been made, the sirens went off as a fair number of police cars high-tailed it down towards Westminster.

I wonder what's going on. An over reaction to something, no doubt. I'll deny typing that if it all goes tits up, mind.

Later

As suspected, all an over reaction. Move along. Nothing to see. >Yawn< Can I go home, yet?

Timing

Monday, June 20th, 2005 12:28 pm
caddyman: (Default)
In one of those moments of cinematic timing, Office Services have just announced over the tannoy, that due to a security alert, the Metropolitan Police have closed Victoria Street from Westminster to the Albert pub. That's a half mile section of the street from Parliament Square down toward the station.

Just as that announcement had been made, the sirens went off as a fair number of police cars high-tailed it down towards Westminster.

I wonder what's going on. An over reaction to something, no doubt. I'll deny typing that if it all goes tits up, mind.

Later

As suspected, all an over reaction. Move along. Nothing to see. >Yawn< Can I go home, yet?

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