Batmobile Poll

Saturday, January 17th, 2009 04:53 pm
caddyman: (Holy Mackerel!)
From time to time, this journal tries to answer the really important questions in life. In the past, I have covered such definitive questions as who is the classic Avengers woman and who is the greatest Dr Who. I believe that I have also touched upon Captain Scarlet.

Today we examine the first great question on 2009. Which is the best of the various TV or movie Batmobiles?

On the scale, 1 is rubbish, 10 is unsurpassed genius.

Since it appears that it is impossible to include pictures in a poll, I have placed reference material here, behind this cut: )

[Poll #1332807]

Batmobile Poll

Saturday, January 17th, 2009 04:53 pm
caddyman: (Holy Mackerel!)
From time to time, this journal tries to answer the really important questions in life. In the past, I have covered such definitive questions as who is the classic Avengers woman and who is the greatest Dr Who. I believe that I have also touched upon Captain Scarlet.

Today we examine the first great question on 2009. Which is the best of the various TV or movie Batmobiles?

On the scale, 1 is rubbish, 10 is unsurpassed genius.

Since it appears that it is impossible to include pictures in a poll, I have placed reference material here, behind this cut: )

[Poll #1332807]
caddyman: (Default)
From the BBC News website: Children's author Eoin Colfer has been commissioned to write a sixth instalment of the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy series.

Now Adams's widow, Jane Belson, has given her approval to bring back the hapless Arthur Dent in a new book entitled And Another Thing...

[Poll #1260933]

Edited to add: I wasn't going to fill out my own poll, but I got fed up with having to tunnel down the links to see how things were turning out.
caddyman: (Default)
From the BBC News website: Children's author Eoin Colfer has been commissioned to write a sixth instalment of the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy series.

Now Adams's widow, Jane Belson, has given her approval to bring back the hapless Arthur Dent in a new book entitled And Another Thing...

[Poll #1260933]

Edited to add: I wasn't going to fill out my own poll, but I got fed up with having to tunnel down the links to see how things were turning out.
caddyman: (opus anxious)
Having been reading Lucya’s blog, syndicated on LJ As [livejournal.com profile] badwitchblog, I got to wondering about people’s attitudes towards ghosts and the supernatural generally.

I am generally sceptical about the entire business, but I do acknowledge that strange things do occur and that it is sometimes somewhere between difficult and impossible to think of a rational explanation. This does not, of course, mean that there is no rational explanation simply that it has not been found yet.

The interesting thing about belief, or lack of it, in the supernatural, is that it seems to operate separately to religion. I know more than one person who believes in God (the supreme supernatural entity!), but dismisses ghosts, goblins, fairies, sprites et al as flights of fancy. I don’t want to get into that, but as a matter of interest, I would like to know if you have religion of some kind. For the purposes of this entry, it doesn’t matter if you are (in no particular order) Christian, Moslem, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu, Pagan or any of the other nine generally recognised world religions. It would just be interesting if you were to indicate belief in a deity or deities.

Even better, if you have any ghostly or strange experiences, it would be fun to read about them: annoyingly, I don’t as such. I have been in a few rooms with strongly unwelcoming atmospheres, but the nearest I ever got to a ghostly encounter was when I was about six or seven years old. I woke up one night and it seemed to me that there were two golden figures standing at the foot of my bed; one tall, the other short1. There was no feeling of threat and they neither spoke nor moved. I thought they might be my Dad and little sister, but they didn’t respond when I spoke and I just lay back down to sleep. When I looked again (I think) a minute or two later they were gone. And that’s that: the nearest I have to a ghost story and it’s a damned boring one at that!

What strange experiences do you have?


[Poll #1253523]

1They were not camels! (NWO in-joke).
caddyman: (opus anxious)
Having been reading Lucya’s blog, syndicated on LJ As [livejournal.com profile] badwitchblog, I got to wondering about people’s attitudes towards ghosts and the supernatural generally.

I am generally sceptical about the entire business, but I do acknowledge that strange things do occur and that it is sometimes somewhere between difficult and impossible to think of a rational explanation. This does not, of course, mean that there is no rational explanation simply that it has not been found yet.

The interesting thing about belief, or lack of it, in the supernatural, is that it seems to operate separately to religion. I know more than one person who believes in God (the supreme supernatural entity!), but dismisses ghosts, goblins, fairies, sprites et al as flights of fancy. I don’t want to get into that, but as a matter of interest, I would like to know if you have religion of some kind. For the purposes of this entry, it doesn’t matter if you are (in no particular order) Christian, Moslem, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu, Pagan or any of the other nine generally recognised world religions. It would just be interesting if you were to indicate belief in a deity or deities.

Even better, if you have any ghostly or strange experiences, it would be fun to read about them: annoyingly, I don’t as such. I have been in a few rooms with strongly unwelcoming atmospheres, but the nearest I ever got to a ghostly encounter was when I was about six or seven years old. I woke up one night and it seemed to me that there were two golden figures standing at the foot of my bed; one tall, the other short1. There was no feeling of threat and they neither spoke nor moved. I thought they might be my Dad and little sister, but they didn’t respond when I spoke and I just lay back down to sleep. When I looked again (I think) a minute or two later they were gone. And that’s that: the nearest I have to a ghost story and it’s a damned boring one at that!

What strange experiences do you have?


[Poll #1253523]

1They were not camels! (NWO in-joke).
caddyman: (Default)
It is a generally accepted fact that roast potatoes are the vegetable in a roast dinner with the highest individual value1. This leads to the necessity for a vegetable exchange rate when there is a paucity of spuds on the menu.

Now if there are four diners and a roast dinner is on the horizon, the well-prepared cook will ensure am equal number of roast potatoes for each person. But what happens when, through some calamity, natural or man-made, there are fifteen roasters? One person will have to make do with three, which is manifestly unfair as the other three have four. Of course, the host will wish to balance the servings by compensating the loser with other vegetables.

Precisely how much broccoli makes up for the missing roaster, or how many peas? Will an additional spoonful of cabbage make up the deficit? Does a roast parsnip equal a roast spud, or is it only 90% of the value and how do you make up the remaining 10% deficit? Then you have veggies so appalling – swede, for example – that adding it is simply heaping insult upon injury. Right thinking people would gladly give up a roaster to do without swede. It is a vegetable so bad that it has a negative value2.

With the roast potato at the top of the roast dinner chain, then, I shall assign it a value of ten. This being the case, what value can we assign to other vegetables? Time, I think, for a poll.

Before we go to the poll, however, I should point out that in this case we are simply considering vegetables and their impact upon the palate; we are not interested in their relative nutritional merits, this is entirely value assigned by taste and smell. Neither are we concerned with meat or fish and certainly not with a Yorkshire Pudding3.


[Poll #1131251]

1By which I mean that it is not a generally accepted fact.

2I shall brook no argument t on this point: swede is vile. If you are odd enough to think otherwise, kindly keep it to yourself. This is a respectable journal.

3The Yorkshire Pudding is that rarity on the dinner plate. It trumps the roast potato. One average sized Yorkshire is worth at least two roasters and as such is an easy way of buying off potato deficits, though again, an imbalance of Yorkshires creates the same concerns one level up. A deficit of both roaster and Yorkshires is unconscionable and the cook should be shot..
caddyman: (Default)
It is a generally accepted fact that roast potatoes are the vegetable in a roast dinner with the highest individual value1. This leads to the necessity for a vegetable exchange rate when there is a paucity of spuds on the menu.

Now if there are four diners and a roast dinner is on the horizon, the well-prepared cook will ensure am equal number of roast potatoes for each person. But what happens when, through some calamity, natural or man-made, there are fifteen roasters? One person will have to make do with three, which is manifestly unfair as the other three have four. Of course, the host will wish to balance the servings by compensating the loser with other vegetables.

Precisely how much broccoli makes up for the missing roaster, or how many peas? Will an additional spoonful of cabbage make up the deficit? Does a roast parsnip equal a roast spud, or is it only 90% of the value and how do you make up the remaining 10% deficit? Then you have veggies so appalling – swede, for example – that adding it is simply heaping insult upon injury. Right thinking people would gladly give up a roaster to do without swede. It is a vegetable so bad that it has a negative value2.

With the roast potato at the top of the roast dinner chain, then, I shall assign it a value of ten. This being the case, what value can we assign to other vegetables? Time, I think, for a poll.

Before we go to the poll, however, I should point out that in this case we are simply considering vegetables and their impact upon the palate; we are not interested in their relative nutritional merits, this is entirely value assigned by taste and smell. Neither are we concerned with meat or fish and certainly not with a Yorkshire Pudding3.


[Poll #1131251]

1By which I mean that it is not a generally accepted fact.

2I shall brook no argument t on this point: swede is vile. If you are odd enough to think otherwise, kindly keep it to yourself. This is a respectable journal.

3The Yorkshire Pudding is that rarity on the dinner plate. It trumps the roast potato. One average sized Yorkshire is worth at least two roasters and as such is an easy way of buying off potato deficits, though again, an imbalance of Yorkshires creates the same concerns one level up. A deficit of both roaster and Yorkshires is unconscionable and the cook should be shot..
caddyman: (Default)
OK Chaps, steady on, now. Stop what you're doing and concentrate. This may be the single most important poll you ever fill in on LJ.

I am trying to find out what the favourite sticky bun is in the world. Admittedly we are, between us, a very small sample group, but I for one am not beyond extrapolating wildly on the basis of a dozen or so votes.

If you have a favourite that's not on the list, feel free to add it in the text box question - but remember I am looking for buns and pastries only. Cakes just push it too wide; maybe there's room for a poll on that in due course.

Anyone who puts a savoury option down will be ridiculed as the weirdo they are.

Get to it, everyone; let's put this debate to bed once and for all!

[Poll #1008088]
caddyman: (Default)
OK Chaps, steady on, now. Stop what you're doing and concentrate. This may be the single most important poll you ever fill in on LJ.

I am trying to find out what the favourite sticky bun is in the world. Admittedly we are, between us, a very small sample group, but I for one am not beyond extrapolating wildly on the basis of a dozen or so votes.

If you have a favourite that's not on the list, feel free to add it in the text box question - but remember I am looking for buns and pastries only. Cakes just push it too wide; maybe there's room for a poll on that in due course.

Anyone who puts a savoury option down will be ridiculed as the weirdo they are.

Get to it, everyone; let's put this debate to bed once and for all!

[Poll #1008088]

Captain Scarlet

Sunday, July 9th, 2006 06:39 pm
caddyman: (Taking it easy with Capt Blue)
It occurred to me today that the TV show is entirely wrong.

Captain Scarlet is treated as the greatest hero Spectrum ever had, yet no-one has a thing to say for his unsung comrade, Captain Blue.

Captain Blue is dependable, honest as the day is long and fearlessly brave. More to the point, he is not indestructible.

Captain Scarlet on the other hand isn't even human. He is a Mysteron construct who "claims" to have broken free of their influence. Yeah, right. At least Captain Black has the courage of his convictions and has stuck with the Mysterons through thick and thin. He knows that when you rat out the good guys, you stay ratted.

No, Captain Scarlet should be kept in solitary and dissected to see what makes him tick. He'll get better, he's indestructible. There's no bravery involved if you know you're going to get better - and he's turned traitor once, what's to say he won't do it again?

Captain Blue's the man. Let's settle this once and for all:

[Poll #765395]

Poll results are purely indicative because I'm right

Captain Scarlet

Sunday, July 9th, 2006 06:39 pm
caddyman: (Taking it easy with Capt Blue)
It occurred to me today that the TV show is entirely wrong.

Captain Scarlet is treated as the greatest hero Spectrum ever had, yet no-one has a thing to say for his unsung comrade, Captain Blue.

Captain Blue is dependable, honest as the day is long and fearlessly brave. More to the point, he is not indestructible.

Captain Scarlet on the other hand isn't even human. He is a Mysteron construct who "claims" to have broken free of their influence. Yeah, right. At least Captain Black has the courage of his convictions and has stuck with the Mysterons through thick and thin. He knows that when you rat out the good guys, you stay ratted.

No, Captain Scarlet should be kept in solitary and dissected to see what makes him tick. He'll get better, he's indestructible. There's no bravery involved if you know you're going to get better - and he's turned traitor once, what's to say he won't do it again?

Captain Blue's the man. Let's settle this once and for all:

[Poll #765395]

Poll results are purely indicative because I'm right

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